Upcoming Events

Forestry and Natural Resources

 

Buckingham County 4-H offers a variety of opportunities for youth ages 5-18 to be involved in different programs, clubs, and activities. Click on the links below to find out what is currently going on in 4-H!

Have you ever wondered what it would be like to raise a sheep or a cow?  Have you ever thought about what is involved in showing a pig before a judge?  You don’t have to live on a farm or have your own livestock to participate in the 4-H livestock club.  You just have to have an interest, a willingness to commit to caring for an animal, and enthusiasm for preparing for and participating in the livestock show. 

Club members raise and show market and breeding animals at the Piedmont Area Livestock Show held each May in Blackstone, Virginia. They work with their animals for three to five months before competition in the show against youth from ten counties in the area. 

Currently the club is on a break but meetings will be starting up again soon. Please call the office at 434-969-4261 or check back for updates!

The Pegasus 4-H Horse and Pony Club is open to all youth ages 7 to 18. The club meets monthly, usually the first Tuesday of the month. Youth work on horse related projects and learn how to work with horses safely and respectfully. All different riding styles and interests are welcome. You do not have to have a horse to participate; however, all members will be around horses to learn to work with them. 

Members have the opportunity to participate in

  • Monthly meetings where they learn about horses either through a presentation by another club member or through hands-on activities
  • Do presentations themselves
  • District horse knowledge competitions
  • Field trips
  • Community service projects
  • Club leadership
  • District and state shows (if they do have a horse or have access to a horse)

Please check back for updated meeting information.

Teen Leaders assist at 4-H Camp, Day Camps, and After-School Programs. The first step to becoming a Teen Leader is to be a Counselor-In-Training (C.I.T.) for one year. All C.I.T.'s and Teen Leaders are required to attend mandatory training sessions. Dates of training sessions will be posted on this site when another series is scheduled. 

Candidates for C.I.T. must be at least 13 years of age on or before January 1 of the upcoming year. C.I.T.'s do not have direct supervision over campers; however, they do help teens and adults with their duties. They also are expected to:

  • Be friendly to everyone.
  • Learn to use first names.
  • Set a good example.
  • Encourage 4-H'er to participate in all activities.
  • Take care of equipment and 4-H property, etc.
  • Respect the 4-H'ers right to have ideas.
  • Bring out the hidden talents of 4-H'er.
  • Promote the six Pillars of Character...trustworthiness, respect, responsibility, fairness, caring, and citizenship.
  • Abide by all program rules.
  • When at Junior 4-H Camp, help the campers feel at home and go over the camp schedule with campers as often as necessary.

Once you have completed your year as a C.I.T., you are now ready to take on the role of a Teen Leader! To be a Teen Leader you must be at least 14 years of age on or before January 1 of the upcoming year. As a teen leader you may have direct supervision over campers and are expected to:

  • Be friendly to everyone.
  • Learn and use first names.
  • Set a good example.
  • Encourage 4-H'er to participate in all activities.
  • Take care of 4-H equipment and property, etc.
  • Respect the 4-Her's right to have ideas.
  • Bring out the hidden talents of 4-H'er.
  • Promoting safety at all times.
  • Encourage every 4-H'er to be considerate of others.
  • Promote the six Pillars of Character...trustworthiness, respect, responsibility, fairness, caring, and citizenship.

When at 4-H Junior Camp Teen Leaders have the additional responsibilities of:

  • Helping the campers feel at home.
  • Go over the camp schedule with campers as often as necessary.
  • Inform campers of procedures used in meal service and clearing of tables.
  • Lead and direct table conversation during meals.
  • Encouraging good eating habits.
  • Checking on illnesses or injuries and, if necessary, report to 4-H Center nurse/EMT.
  • Getting campers to various locations on time.
  • Getting quiet after "lights out".
  • Maintaining necessary discipline by helping campers understand the limits prescribed for group living situations.
  • Serve as a class assistant or helper and/or teach a class.
  • Assist with a group of campers.
  • Assist with other duties as assigned (ex: pool spotter, program set-up, etc.).
  • Help with recreation, evening programs, and campfire activities.
  • Help to evaluate camp on the basis of the camp objectives.
  • Be responsible to the Camp Director(s) or the person he/she designates.

Engaging with Communities

Virginia Cooperative Extension specialists in community viability work with Extension agents, campus-based faculty, organizational partners, communities, and individuals to further opportunity and build capacity in five program areas:   

Examples of our work include training county elected officials, educating entrepreneurs, facilitating collaborative projects, supporting the growth of community food systems and local economies, enhancing agent skills and community capacity in facilitation and leadership, conducting problem-driven research, and creating publications and tools that address critical community needs.

Do you have a question about Community Viability?

Perhaps one of the Community Viability specialists below can help you. Contact a Community Viability specialist or direct a question to them using our Ask an Expert system.

Community Viability Specialists

See a list of our Community Viability Specialists